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Wildlife

Florida Box Turtle

Florida Box Turtle, Terrapene Carolina Bauri. This cute little girl is a great example of what Florida box turtle looks like. Florida box turtles are a terrestrial species which typically inhabit damp forests and marshes. They can be found from the Keys north to the very southern portion of Georga.…...

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Manatees and their babies

On March 21, 2017 a mother manatee was seen swimming the waters of Pinellas County, Florida. Manatee babies known as calves, will stay with...

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Black Bears are not scary after all.

They are actually almost vegetarian! http://www.zmescience.com/ecology/animals-ecology/myth-buster-bears-not-ferocious-flesh-eaters/  ...

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Bears bite off their foot pads in the winter

—–Fun Fact—- Did you know that bears bite off their foot pads in the winter?! They grow fresh foot pads so they won’t have callouses. It’s like a mani-pedi for bears!...

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Imperiled Species Management Plan rule changes

Imperiled Species Management Plan rule changes are in effect Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.) Jan. 18, 2017 Suggested Tweet: Imperiled Species Management Plan rule changes in effect. @MyFWC: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/…/bulletins/18133ff #Florida #wildlife The Imperiled Species Management Plan rule changes…...

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Sabal Trails Gopher Tortoise Turmoil

Sabal Trails Gopher Tortoise Turmoil by: Aymee Laurain   A recently released bi-weekly report on the Sabal Trail pipeline demonstrated some insight on the ecological effects of the gopher tortoise in the area.  The report Docket No. CP15-17-000  stated the following: ●Spread 3, Georgia, a total of 4 burrows were investigated and eliminated…...

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URSUS AMERICANUS FLORIDANUS – THE FLORIDA BLACK BEAR – AN UMBRELLA SPECIES

URSUS AMERICANUS FLORIDANUS – THE FLORIDA BLACK BEAR – AN UMBRELLA SPECIES Did you know… Florida black bears historically roamed throughout Florida and into parts of southern Georgia, Mississippi, and Alabama. In the 1970s, there were 300-500 individuals left due to habitat loss and fragmentation, as well as overhunting. For…...

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