Imagine Our Florida, Inc. 

 

Is on a Mission to Educate and Empower the people of Florida

to become a voice for our wildlife, advocate for environmental stewardship,

and coexist within our unique ecosystems.

Our purpose is to bring people together in a shared vision to preserve and protect Florida’s wildlife, habitat, and ecosystem. We plan to accomplish this via science-based education and the development of appreciation and respect for the natural world and our place within it.

Using our custom designed lesson plans,  IOF volunteers encourage critical thinking through exploration and discovery.  We make it a fun, hands-on experience while showing people of all ages how to put away their phones and connect with Florida’s wildlife and wild spaces. When folks understand the sentient beings with whom we share our state, they learn to respect them, rather than fear them. They begin to realize the importance of the land and water we share. Therefore,  IOF  offers opportunities for beach cleanups and teaches the importance of recycling. For those who want to advocate on behalf of  Florida’s wildlife or natural resources, we are prepared to instruct them on how to be most effective.  In addition, IOF will soon launch groundbreaking research which will provide a better understanding of human caused stress in Florida Black Bears and will potentially lead to the proposal of more responsible wildlife management practices.  There are over 20 million Floridians and 113 million annual visitors, all of whom can become voices for our voiceless wildlife. When each of us does our part, no matter how big or small, we can all begin to Imagine Our Florida where we peacefully coexist with our native wild friends.
Connect. Respect. Coexist.

Upcoming events

  • 26 Jan 2019

    Manatee Festival

    The Festival is a Fund Raiser for the Orange City Community. The proceeds will benefit “Friends of Blue Spring State…

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Imagine Our Florida, Inc.

Our purpose is to bring people together in a shared vision to preserve and protect Florida's wildlife, habitat and ecosystem. We plan to accomplish this via science- based education and the development of appreciation and respect for the natural world and our place within it.
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.Imagine Our Florida, Inc. added 2 new photos.
Robins - Florida Snow Birds

* Robins prefer cooler temperatures which is why they fly north to escape the southern heat.
* Robins will start to migrate back north when they feel a 37-degree average daily isotherm ( ground temperature above 37*).
* Male robins will arrive at their northern destinations about 2 weeks earlier than the females. This gives them time to claim their territory.
* Robins do not mate for life, however, the male will stay to help feed his chicks.
*Chicks leave the nest in August and live to be 5-6 years old.
* Robins begin to migrate south when the temperature causes the ground to become too hard to dig for earthworms, their main source of food.
* Robins will resort to eating berries and insects until that food supply starts to dwindle.
* During migration, robins can fly up to 36 mph and cover 100-200 miles a day.
*Winter months are spent in Florida, southern Louisiana, southern Texas, southern Arizona, southern New Mexico, Southern California, and northern Mexico.
* Most robins migrate intermediate distances but some have migrated from Vancouver to as far south as Guatemala.

As the temperature warms in our neighboring states, robins will begin to make their way across Florida. Keep an eye on your bird bath. A flock of robins just might stop by for a quick dip and drink.
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.
----Coral Reef----

Florida is the only state in the continental United States with shallow coral reef near its coast. Coral reefs create specialized habitats that provide shelter, food, and breeding sites for numerous plants and animals. Florida's coral reef system stretches hundreds of miles. It is the world’s third largest, with nearly 1,400 species of plants and animals and 500 species of fish. Marine scientists have found nearly half the reef was missing. Where once there were reefs, now are just sea grass and mud. The only reefs still intact and alive with fish and plants were far from the shore. Natural forces such as extreme rainfall and heatwaves may have played some part, but it is more likely that man was responsible. It probably took the combination of intensified fishing off the Florida Keys, the building of cities, causeways, pollution, the flow of freshwater, sediments, and nutrients from the land. Any of these factors may have led to the stress and decline of the reef. But it would have taken a combination of all of them to kill off half the Coral reef. Reefs are recognized as being essential to the whole marine ecosystem. Fish spawn and grow around coral, which in turn helps to regulate carbon dioxide levels in the oceans. They also protect coastal areas from erosion. Take out any part of the reef system and the whole is threatened. Protected reserves are urgently needed and fishing must be controlled, regulated and policed. Not only do farmers, cities and mining companies need to reduce their pollution as well as prevent the runoff of sediment and nutrients into the seas but climate change must be addressed. If oceans continue to absorb CO2, the increased acidity will be fatal and coral bleaching will continue to worsen. All we may have left will be the deeper reefs, and Florida's rich, diverse and astonishingly beautiful coral reefs may all but disappear within a lifetime.
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.
FWC reports Several Florida species no longer warrant listing.
One of those species, the southern fox squirrel was previously known as the Sherman's Fox Squirrel. The name change came about after research discovered the Sherman's fox squirrel is not genetically distinct from other southeastern squirrels.
Learn more about the success of conserving these and the other animals who have been delisted here: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/FLFFWCC/bulletins/2281282?reqfrom=share
Photo Credit: Andy Waldo
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.
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The Shark Valley Visitor Center will soon get solar panels, thanks to Florida Power & Light and the National Park Service.
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.
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--- Tuesday Trivia ----

The Florida Cracker Horse is a valuable and vital part of Florida’s heritage. While still rare, there are now over 1,000 registered horses, and the number continues to grow each year. The Florida Cracker Horse traces its ancestry to Spanish stock brought to Florida in the 1500s. They were given their name from the sound of the whips cracking as they worked cattle. The Florida Cracker horse exhibits great endurance in an unfavorable environment. This horse exemplifies great patience and strength. The Cracker horse can work all day and night, traveling without any additional care requirements. When the horses were left to roam freely, they evolved over time as a result of natural selection. They were tempered and molded by the challenging environment. And, in addition to playing an important role in the lives of Seminole Indians, they eventually helped Florida become a state of agriculture and ranching. Through the efforts of several private families and the Florida government, the breed was saved from extinction, but there is still concern about its low numbers. The breeds low numbers are considered to be at a critical point. The state has three small herds in Tallahassee, Withlacoochee State Forest, and Paynes Prairie State Preserve. The state maintains two lines for breeding purposes and the line that roams the Paynes Prairie State Preserve for display purposes. By 1989, these three herds and around 100 other horses owned by private families were all that remained of the breed. The population is considered to be "critical," meaning that there are between 100 and 300 active adult breeding mares in existence today. Effective, July 1, 2008, the Florida House of Representatives, declared the Florida Cracker Horse the official state horse.
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.
Imagine Our Florida, Inc.
--- Tuesday Trivia ----

The Florida Cracker Horse is a valuable and vital part of Florida’s heritage. While still rare, there are now over 1,000 registered horses, and the number continues to grow each year. The Florida Cracker Horse traces its ancestry to Spanish stock brought to Florida in the 1500s. They were given their name from the sound of the whips cracking as they worked cattle. The Florida Cracker horse exhibits great endurance in an unfavorable environment. This horse exemplifies great patience and strength. The Cracker horse can work all day and night, traveling without any additional care requirements. When the horses were left to roam freely, they evolved over time as a result of natural selection. They were tempered and molded by the challenging environment. And, in addition to playing an important role in the lives of Seminole Indians, they eventually helped Florida become a state of agriculture and ranching. Through the efforts of several private families and the Florida government, the breed was saved from extinction, but there is still concern about its low numbers. The breeds low numbers are considered to be at a critical point. The state has three small herds in Tallahassee, Withlacoochee State Forest, and Paynes Prairie State Preserve. The state maintains two lines for breeding purposes and the line that roams the Paynes Prairie State Preserve for display purposes. By 1989, these three herds and around 100 other horses owned by private families were all that remained of the breed. The population is considered to be "critical," meaning that there are between 100 and 300 active adult breeding mares in existence today. Effective, July 1, 2008, the Florida House of Representatives, declared the Florida Cracker Horse the official state horse.